Hyperoxia and Hypocapnia During Pediatric ECMO: Associations With Complications, Mortality, and Functional Status Among Survivors. (Dalal)

Cashen K, et al. Hyperoxia and Hypocapnia During Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Associations With Complications, Mortality, and Functional Status Among Survivors. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2018 Mar;19(3):245-253.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of hyperoxia and hypocapnia during pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and their relationships to complications, mortality, and functional status among survivors.

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The Impact of Fluid Overload on Outcomes in Children Treated With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study. (Carroll)

Selewski DT, Askenazi DJ, Bridges BC, Cooper DS, Fleming GM, Paden ML, Verway M, Sahay R, King E, Zappitelli M. The Impact of Fluid Overload on Outcomes in Children Treated With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Dec;18(12):1126-1135.

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the epidemiology of fluid overload and its association with mortality and duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in children treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

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Lung Rest During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Neonatal Respiratory Failure-Practice Variations and Outcomes. (Duke)

Alapati D, et al. Lung Rest During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Neonatal Respiratory Failure-Practice Variations and Outcomes. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Jul;18(7):667-674.

OBJECTIVE: Describe practice variations in ventilator strategies used for lung rest during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure in neonates, and assess the potential impact of various lung rest strategies on the duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the duration of mechanical ventilation after decannulation.

DATA SOURCES: Retrospective cohort analysis from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry database during the years 2008-2013.

STUDY SELECTION: All extracorporeal membrane oxygenation runs for infants less than or equal to 30 days of life for pulmonary reasons were included.

DATA EXTRACTION: Ventilator type and ventilator settings used for lung rest at 24 hours after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation were obtained.

DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 3,040 cases met inclusion criteria. Conventional mechanical ventilation was used for lung rest in 88% of cases and high frequency ventilation was used in 12%. In the conventional mechanical ventilation group, 32% used positive end-expiratory pressure strategy of 4-6 cm H2O (low), 22% used 7-9 cm H2O (mid), and 43% used 10-12 cm H2O (high). High frequency ventilation was associated with an increased mean (SEM) hours of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (150.2 [0.05] vs 125 [0.02]; p < 0.001) and an increased mean (SEM) hours of mechanical ventilation after decannulation (135 [0.09] vs 100.2 [0.03]; p = 0.002), compared with conventional mechanical ventilation among survivors. Within the conventional mechanical ventilation group, use of higher positive end-expiratory pressure was associated with a decreased mean (SEM) hours of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (high vs low: 136 [1.06] vs 156 [1.06], p = 0.001; mid vs low: 141 [1.06] vs 156 [1.06]; p = 0.04) but increased duration of mechanical ventilation after decannulation in the high positive end-expiratory pressure group compared with low positive end-expiratory pressure (p = 0.04) among survivors.

CONCLUSIONS: Wide practice variation exists with regard to ventilator settings used for lung rest during neonatal respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Use of high frequency ventilation when compared with conventional mechanical ventilation and use of low positive end-expiratory pressure strategy when compared with mid positive end-expiratory pressure and high positive end-expiratory pressure strategy is associated with longer duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Further research to provide evidence to drive optimization of pulmonary management during neonatal respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is warranted.

The Utility of High-Fidelity Simulation for Training Critical Care Fellows in the Management of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Emergencies: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (Sirignano)

Zakhary BM, et al. The Utility of High-Fidelity Simulation for Training Critical Care Fellows in the Management of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Emergencies: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Crit Care Med. 2017 Aug;45(8):1367-1373.

OBJECTIVE: Although extracorporeal membrane oxygenation volume has increased, proficiency in the technology requires extensive training. We compared traditional water-drill-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training with simulation-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training with the hypothesis that simulation-based training is superior.

DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: Academic medical center.

SUBJECTS: Pulmonary/critical care fellows.

INTERVENTIONS: Participants had a preintervention simulated extracorporeal membrane oxygenation emergency (Sim1-recirculation) then randomized into simulation and traditional groups. Each group participated in three teaching scenarios, via high-fidelity simulation or via water-drills. After 6 weeks and after 1 year, participants returned for two simulated extracorporeal membrane oxygenation emergencies (Sim2-pump failure and Sim3-access insufficiency). Sim2 was a case encountered during teaching, whereas Sim3 was novel. A critical action, necessary for resolution of each scenario, was preidentified for timing.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Primary outcome was time required to perform critical actions. Twenty-one fellows participated in the study (simulation, 10; traditional, 11). Groups had similar scenario scores (p = 0.4) and times to critical action (p = 0.8) on Sim1. At 6 weeks, both groups had similar scenario scores on Sim2 (p = 0.5), but the simulation group scored higher on Sim3 (p = 0.03). Times to critical actions were shorter in the simulation group during Sim2 (127 vs 174 s, p = 0.004) and Sim3 (159 vs 300 s; p = 0.04). These findings persisted at 1 year.

CONCLUSIONS: In novice critical care fellows, simulation-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training is superior to traditional training. Benefits transfer to novel scenarios and are maintained over the long term. Further studies evaluating the utility of simulation in other learner groups and for maintenance of proficiency are required.