Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants: A Multicenter Study. (Stulce)

Rowan CM, Smith LS, Loomis A, et al. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants: A Multicenter Study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2017 Apr;18(4):304-309.

OBJECTIVE: Immunodeficiency is both a preexisting condition and a risk factor for mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe a series of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome based on the recent Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference guidelines with the objective to better define survival of this population.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a retrospective database.

SETTING: Twelve U.S. pediatric centers.

PATIENTS: Pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients requiring mechanical ventilation.

INTERVENTIONS: None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During the first week of mechanical ventilation, patients were categorized as: no pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome or mild, moderate, or severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome based on oxygenation index or oxygen saturation index. Univariable logistic regression evaluated the association between pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and PICU mortality. A total of 91.5% of the 211 patients met criteria for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome using the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference definition: 61.1% were severe, 27.5% moderate, and 11.4% mild. Overall survival was 39.3%. Survival decreased with worsening pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: no pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome 66.7%, mild 63.6%, odds ratio = 1.1 (95% CI, 0.3-4.2; p = 0.84), moderate 52.8%, odds ratio = 1.8 (95% CI, 0.6-5.5; p = 0.31), and severe 24.6%, odds ratio = 6.1 (95% CI, 2.1-17.8; p < 0.001). Nonsurvivors were more likely to have multiple consecutive days at moderate and severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (p < 0.001). Moderate and severe patients had longer PICU length of stay (p = 0.01) and longer mechanical ventilation course (p = 0.02) when compared with those with mild or no pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nonsurvivors had a higher median maximum oxygenation index than survivors at 28.6 (interquartile range, 15.5-49.9) versus 15.0 (interquartile range, 8.4-29.6) (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION: In this multicenter cohort, the majority of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with respiratory failure met oxygenation criteria for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome based on the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference definition within the first week of invasive mechanical ventilation. Length of invasive mechanical ventilation, length of PICU stay, and mortality increased as the severity of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome worsened.

Early Noninvasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist Versus Noninvasive Flow-Triggered Pressure Support Ventilation in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure: A Physiologic Randomized Controlled Trial. (Carroll)

Chidini G, et al. Early Noninvasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist Versus Noninvasive Flow-Triggered Pressure Support Ventilation in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure: A Physiologic Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Nov;17(11):e487-e495.

OBJECTIVE: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist has been shown to improve patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure. Objective of this study was to compare the effect of noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist versus noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support on patient-ventilator interaction in children with acute respiratory failure, when delivered as a first-line respiratory support.

DESIGN: Prospective randomized crossover physiologic study.

SETTING: Pediatric six-bed third-level PICU.

PATIENTS: Eighteen children with acute respiratory failure needing noninvasive ventilation were enrolled at PICU admission.

INTERVENTIONS: Enrolled children were allocated to receive two 60-minutes noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support and noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist trials in a crossover randomized sequence.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Primary endpoint was the asynchrony index. Parameters describing patient-ventilator interaction and gas exchange were also considered as secondary endpoints. Noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support: 1) reduced asynchrony index (p = 0.001) and the number of asynchronies per minute for each type of asynchrony; 2) it increased the neuroventilatory efficiency index (p = 0.001), suggesting better neuroventilatory coupling; 3) reduced inspiratory and expiratory delay times (p = 0.001) as well as lower peak and mean airway pressure (p = 0.006 and p = 0.038, respectively); 4) lowered oxygenation index (p = 0.043). No adverse event was reported.

CONCLUSIONS: In children with mild early acute respiratory failure, noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist was feasible and safe. Noninvasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to noninvasive flow-triggered pressure support improved patient-ventilator interaction.

Dexmedetomidine Use in Critically Ill Children With Acute Respiratory Failure. (Emrath)

Grant MJ, et al. Dexmedetomidine Use in Critically Ill Children With Acute Respiratory Failure. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Sep 20. [Epub ahead of print]

OBJECTIVE: Care of critically ill children includes sedation but current therapies are suboptimal. To describe dexmedetomidine use in children supported on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of data from the Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure clinical trial.

SETTING: Thirty-one PICUs.

PATIENTS: Data from 2,449 children; 2 weeks to 17 years old.

INTERVENTIONS: Sedation practices were unrestrained in the usual care arm. Patients were categorized as receiving dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative, secondary sedative, periextubation agent, or never prescribed. Dexmedetomidine exposure and sedation and clinical profiles are described.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of 1,224 usual care patients, 596 (49%) received dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative patients (n = 138; 11%) were less critically ill (Pediatric Risk of Mortality III-12 score median, 6 [interquartile range, 3-11]) and when compared with all other cohorts, experienced more episodic agitation. In the intervention group, time in sedation target improved from 28% to 50% within 1 day of initiating dexmedetomidine as a primary sedative. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary sedative usual care patients (n = 280; 23%) included more children with severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome or organ failure. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary sedative patients experienced more inadequate pain (22% vs 11%) and sedation (31% vs 16%) events. Dexmedetomidine as a periextubation agent patients (n = 178; 15%) were those known to not tolerate an awake, intubated state and experienced a shorter ventilator weaning process (2.1 vs 2.3 d).

CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the use of dexmedetomidine as a primary agent in low criticality patients offering the benefit of rapid achievement of targeted sedation levels. Dexmedetomidine as a secondary agent does not appear to add benefit. The use of dexmedetomidine to facilitate extubation in children intolerant of an awake, intubated state may abbreviate ventilator weaning. These data support a broader armamentarium of pediatric critical care sedation.

A Simple and Robust Bedside Model for Mortality Risk in Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. (Sirignano)

Spicer AC, et al. A Simple and Robust Bedside Model for Mortality Risk in Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2016 Aug 3. [Epub ahead of print]

OBJECTIVES: Despite declining mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome is still involved in up to one third of pediatric intensive care deaths. The recently convened Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference has outlined research priorities for the field, which include the need for accurate bedside risk stratification of patients. We aimed to develop a simple yet robust model of mortality risk among pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome to facilitate the targeted application of high-risk investigational therapies and stratification for enrollment in clinical trials.

DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter cohort.

SETTING: Five academic PICUs.

PATIENTS: Three hundred eight children greater than 1 month and less than or equal to 18 years old, admitted to the ICU, with bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph and PaO2/FIO2 ratio less than 300 in the clinical absence of left atrial hypertension.

INTERVENTIONS: None.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Twenty clinical variables were recorded in the following six categories: demographics, medical history, oxygenation, ventilation, radiographic imaging, and multiple organ dysfunction. Data were measured 0-24 and 48-72 hours after acute respiratory distress syndrome onset (day 1 and 3) and examined for associations with hospital mortality. Among 308 enrolled patients, mortality was 17%. Children with a history of cancer and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplant had higher mortality (47% vs 11%; p < 0.001). Oxygenation index, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio, extrapulmonary organ dysfunction, Pediatric Risk of Mortality-3, and positive cumulative fluid balance were each associated with mortality. Using two statistical approaches, we found that a parsimonious model of mortality risk using only oxygenation index and cancer/hematopoietic stem cell transplant history performed as well as other more complex models that required additional variables.

CONCLUSIONS: In the PICU, oxygenation index and cancer/hematopoietic stem cell transplant history can be used on acute respiratory distress syndrome day 1 or day 3 to predict hospital mortality without the need for more complex models. These findings may simplify risk assessment for clinical trials, counseling families, and high-risk interventions such as extracorporeal life support.